Building Collective Capacity for Program Quality Improvement: Boston Beyond’s Certified Observer Network

Emily Dodge

Abstract


This article describes Boston Beyond’s effort to develop a network of out-of-school time program partner staff trained in implementing a program quality observation tool. Participant survey (n = 63) and interview (n = 4) feedback demonstrate that the network is meeting its goals of advancing participants’ professional development, positively impacting organizations, and creating a system-level model of peer-to-peer program quality improvement. Areas of improvement are identified for each goal. Questions of sustainability, planned network improvements, and considerations for others seeking to establish similar networks are discussed.


Keywords


observation; program quality; program improvement

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References


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DOI: https://doi.org/10.5195/jyd.2020.818

Copyright (c) 2020 Emily Dodge

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